Cooperative Shorebird Conservation

The Atlantic Flyway

Shorebirds cross thousands of miles each year from the barren tundra of the arctic to the wind swept beaches of Tierra del Fuego in the southern hemisphere. The majority of shorebirds breeding in Alaska and Canada spend their non-breeding period in South American or Caribbean countries.

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Current Threats

Threats to shorebirds have become more diverse and widespread in recent decades and pose serious conservation challenges. Hunting, predators, human disturbance, habitat loss and change, and climate change threaten these birds’ survival

But there is Hope!

Recent conservation gains show that we can reverse these downward spirals across the flyway. However, we must act fast and undertake our own collaborative, far-reaching call to action.

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The Atlantic Flyway

Shorebirds cross thousands of miles each year from the barren tundra of the arctic to the wind swept beaches of Tierra del Fuego in the southern hemisphere. The majority of shorebirds breeding in Alaska and Canada spend their non-breeding period in South American or Caribbean countries.


Current Threats

Threats to shorebirds have become more diverse and widespread in recent decades and pose serious conservation challenges. These bird’s survival is threatened by hunting, predators, human disturbance, habitat loss and change, and climate change.


But there is Hope!

Recent conservation gains show that we can reverse these downward spirals across the flyway. However, we must act fast and undertake our own collaborative, far-reaching call to action.


Tracking Progress in Our Storymap


Partners throughout the hemisphere are addressing threats to shorebirds and working to meet the Atlantic Flyway Shorebird Initiative’s conservation goal of increasing focal shorebird populations 10% by 2025.


Track partner progress in this storymap

Effective Conservation

Effective conservation requires a wide-ranging approach to identify and reduce threats throughout the flyway. To be truly effective, such an approach must coordinate research, conservation, and management efforts of many groups across multiple political boundaries and consolidate resources.


The Business Plan


Published in February 2015. This landmark Business Plan represents the full suite of strategies and actions needed to conserve 15 Atlantic Flyway shorebirds.



Working Group


Several working groups have formed to help guide AFSI and implement projects to achieve the ambitious goals of the partnership. Contact a group lead to get engaged!



Our Partners


A variety of international, federal and state agencies, non-profits and individuals are involved to help implement on-the-ground conservation efforts.


Meet the Birds


Shorebirds are small to medium size waders often characterized by long legs and probing bills. They are amazing migrants, often making trips across multiple continents.


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Important Habitats


A wide variety of shorebirds use the Atlantic Flyway. Different species of shorebirds will depend on different types of habitat during their life. An effective conservation plan must encompass habitat conservation.


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Habitat Conservation

The Atlantic Flyway Shorebird Initiative is focusing conservation efforts on specific habitats throughout the flyway.


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Atlantic Flyway Shorebird Initiative


Cooperative conservation for shorebirds throughout the Atlantic Flyway


Resources


Are you involved in shorebird conservation? We have project tables, result chains, maps, and funding information to assist in your conservation efforts!


Contact Us


Atlantic Flyway
Shorebird Initiative
Scott Johnston, USFWS
Phone: 413.253.8557
Email: scott_johnston@fws.gov